Doriane Souilhol & Douglas Morland 
la compagnie, lieu de création, Marseille | 10 May – 30 June, 2018 
Programmed as part of the Printemps de l'art contemporain festival and of the cultural season Quel Amour!
L’intrigue se cherche dans le dénouement de son nœud is the collaborative ‘writing’ of an exhibition that has emerged from a conversation between the artists and the curator, and which recounts, step by step, its own conditions of conception and evolution. Borrowing from the vocabulary of the theatre, the title of the project defines a critical and working framework that reflects the process of the exhibition’s meta-creation.  
In the French theatrical lexicon, nœud [the climax] is that moment when all the elements of the plot come together, the suspense of an unknown denouement to come, a creative entanglement that prompts the realisation of the final action. In L’intrigue se cherche dans le dénouement de son nœud, the nœud symbolises the exchanges between the artists, the multiple directions of work and orientations of the project, and the idea that the exhibition writes its own intrigue [plot] while resolving the creative and collaborative tensions within the realisation of new artworks. Reflections by the artists also gave rise to an exploration of theatricality: the sound of language and of objects, performativity, mise-en-scène, interpretation.... 

L’intrigue se cherche dans le dénouement de son noeud takes the shape of a publication and an exhibition. The publication shows the artists’ ‘workshop of ideas’, which developed over a cross-residency between Marseille and Glasgow, and in a remote ‘transmission’ of ideas, documentation and sketches. It returns to their conversations and reveals the disparate threads subsequently used to weave the exhibition.

Among these threads, the very idea of the exchange - of the remote communication undertaken between two artists from different countries and who speak different languages - provided substance in the creation of the project. The artists’ conversations have revolved around the structure of language (spoken, of the body or transmitted by different technologies), the interference and misunderstanding that happens between languages and the creative potential that arises from language misheard. The artists explored the structure of language as well as the cultural veils that can layer upon it, thus, the exhibition takes as its subtitle one of the main ideas that grew from the exchanges: l’échafaudage du langage / the scaffolding of language. 
A project by Amandine Guruceaga & Francesca Zappia 
Texts by Jenny Brownrigg, Guillaume Condello, Timothée Chaillou, Anna Dezeuze, Éric Mangion 
With the participation of Stéphanie Cherpin, Helen de Main, Sandro Della Noce, Guillaume Gattier, Amandine Guruceaga, Benjamin Marianne, James McLardy, Douglas Morland, Philippe Murphy, Bobby Niven, Alys Owen, Emilie Perotto and the poet Guillaume Condello. 

A name that clears your throat, catches your ear and ends up infiltrating your thoughts. If you have not heard of Raoul Reynolds, that comes as no surprise. In the shadows he remained, in silence. Raoul Reynolds was one whose many dark paths in life— despite ardent investigation — leave us with countless unanswered questions. 
Raoul Reynolds was a pedlar, a confidence trickster, a camelot of art, a storybook character thumbing his nose at History with a capital H as it speeds unforgivingly by, retaining only its handful of chosen ones to blacken its pages and fill up our libraries. Here, we are offered another experience: change the angle and look at the margin. Artist, his default role, he used as a cover for his life of secrets while creating works of art as if they were gateways that would enable him to cross through time. He would be beaten at his own game though, while furiously creating pieces with enough impertinence to assimilate and crystallise myriad 20th century artistic movements. Alternately a surrealist and a minimalist, he would overcome stylistic barriers and wear the most unexpected masks. It was more particularly at the end of his life, though, during exile, that he let himself indulge totally, undistractedly in art. 
Here is a retrospective path, a set of works attributed to him, a hypothetical stack where our certainties sometimes give way to doubts, and doubts give way to stories fuelled by our own fantasies.

Published by Poursuite Editions
164 pgs, 24 × 17 cm, Softcover, 2018
ISBN: 978-2-490140-05-3

A cultural exploration of the Cnap collection
Grant for Curatorial Research, Centre national des arts plastiques, Paris, 2016
An investigation within the collections of the French national fund of contemporary art (set up 1791) leading to question the changing approaches to artworks’ reproduction in the last two centuries (from the 19th century copies to the postmodernist reappropriations in visual art, fashion and design) and to highlight the different cultural values and specific socio-political contexts behind the production of these works.
Curated by Amandine Guruceaga & Francesca Zappia
   Scotland Street School Museum, Glasgow | 8-25 April 2016 - Programmed as part of Glasgow International Festival 2016
   La Friche la Belle de Mai, Marseille | 26 Aug. - 30 Oct. 2016 - Programmed as part of La Rentrée de l'art contemporain
“Art, this profound passion that has been a cover for so many years, was the Pole Star of all my life”  
Raoul Reynolds  

The exhibition was made possible with the assistance of the artists Stéphanie Cherpin, Helen de Main, Sandro Della Noce, Guillaume Gattier, Amandine Guruceaga, Benjamin Marianne, James McLardy, Douglas Morland, Philippe Murphy, Bobby Niven, Alys Owen, Emilie Perotto and the poet Guillaume Condello

Partners and sponsors: TANK Art Space, La Friche la Belle de Mai, Fluxus Art Projects, Glasgow City Council, Ville de Marseille, Région Provence Alpes-Côte d'Azur, Hope Scott Trust, Institut français, Glasgow Sculpture Studios, Alliance française Glasgow, Art-O-Rama, Marseille Expos.

This first retrospective exhibition dedicated to the work of Raoul Reynolds (1882-1969) traces the career of a highly idiosyncratic character whose long life and work reflected a period of immense social and historical change.

The exhibition presents a set of works from the early 1900s until his death in 1969 which display the influence of a wide range of 20th century art movements, while, at the same time, revealing how Reynolds’ practice was very much shaped by his own mysterious life.
 
Raoul Reynolds was a Scottish / French artist. The exhibition, thus, is presented in Glasgow and Marseille on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the twinning of the two cities.
The shows will coincide with key moments in both cities’ contemporary arts calendars: Glasgow International Festival and ART-O-RAMA, International Fair of Contemporary Art. 

A curatorial programme about the East End of Glasgow and its regeneration 
The Pipe Factory, Glasgow | 14 Nov - 7 Dec, 2014 
Within the shadows of this year of ‘Culture’ and Commonwealth Games hosted for the most part in the East End of Glasgow, there has been a growing disquiet, a deep questioning of the regeneration project of this once flourishing industrial area, its culture and its inhabitants. Traces of what the East End of Glasgow has been – its characters, communities, shops, markets, cinemas and theatres – remain in the undeniable energy and memories of the East Enders.  
Rather than ameliorating the life conditions of the East Enders, these ‘renewals’ created large scale depopulation, polluted wastelands, and new ruins fortuitously designed for collapsing concrete spectacles. The latest of these series of urban plans is the Clyde Gateway, whose promotional video (see youtube) heralds the coming of a ‘New East End’. 
 
If the memory of the East End is intended to be shortened, if not removed, let’s transmit and broadcast its contents while it still has life. Starting from an interrogation of the local context of the East End, the East End Transmissions project is built as a platform which aims to stretch and stress the interpretations of this context, amplify opinions, engage ideas and provoke discussion about history, gentrification and regeneration in the area. Within its different constituent parts (exhibition, program of events, documentation, website, posters, and publication), East End Transmissions aims to produce critical content and reveal the secondary stories too often dismissed and omitted from the records. 
 
The programme ended a six-month curatorial residency at The Pipe Factory.

Artists: Jen Devonshire, Aideen Doran, Virginia Hutchison, Thomas Leyland Collins, Kit Mead, Douglas Morland, Janie Nicoll, Lyndsey Smith, Susannah Stark. 
Community members: Jane, Margaret, Peter, William and the children of PEEK Project.

DOWNLOAD:
The publication East End Transmissions
The website project eastendtransmissions.net is now archived. Its contents have been gathered in this document. 
Research project presented at the Summer Academy in Salzburg, within the frame of “Curating the boundary condition: encounters with the outside”, workshop with Nancy Adajania Summer 2014
This project reflects upon a new empirical concept that grew up in the first half of the 20th century from the progresses of modern physics and quantum mechanics. Since its premises, Western science has been based on the principle of casuality, intended as the relationship between cause and effect. New concepts brought in the 20th century by physics theories – relativity, quantum mechanics, indeterminism and uncertainty principle – have broken the axiomatic, linear, truth of the cause-effect principle, opening towards an approach to natural phenomena and laws of universe which only predicts the probabilities of possible outcomes.

Synchronicity is a term coined by Carl Gustav Jung from the 1920s to express the experience of two or more events as meaningful related – in opposition to the experience of events as casually related. “Synchronicity takes the coincidence of events in space and time as meaning something more than mere chance, namely, a peculiar interdependence of objective events among themselves as well as with the subjective (psychic) states of the observer or observers” (Jung, 1949). For Jung, the principle of synchronicity was descriptive of a governing dynamic that underlies the whole of human experience and history – social, emotional, psychological and spiritual.  
His first ideas on synchronicity evolved during the 1950s – and have been stated in his essay Synchronizität als ein Prinzip akausaler Zusammenhänge (Synchronicity – An Acausal Connecting Principle) of 1952 – following exchanges with Albert Einstein and Wolfgang Pauli outlining parallels between his synchronicity theories and the ones of relativity and quantum mechanics.  

Artists: Vincenzo Agnetti, Samuel Beckett, Alighiero Boetti, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Yves Klein, Stéphane Mallarmé, Bruce Nauman. 
Artists: Vincenzo Agnetti, Samuel Beckett, Alighiero Boetti, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Yves Klein, Stéphane Mallarmé, Bruce Nauman. 
A lecture about an imaginary exhibition
Presented in collaboration with Giulia Lamoni at the Universität für angewandte Kunst, Vienna | Jan. 2014.  
This lecture – part of the programme Substantial Change? A Gender-Critical Look at Material and Medium, organised by the University of Applied Art in Vienna in 2013-14 – was articulated as an imaginary exhibition, and aimed to explore zones of intersection between the use of textile materials and the questioning of symbolic and material constructions of ‘home’ and ‘belonging’ in the work of a series of contemporary artists from different geographical and cultural locations. While discussing gender-specific connotations ‘sticking’ to textiles, it will look at what happens when these materials are created or appropriated by both female and male artists, in order to explore the complex making and unmaking of ‘home’ as a place of safety, intimacy and memory in an increasingly, and asymmetrically, ‘global’ world. 
 
The textile artworks discussed here – whose feminist genealogies are envisioned as non-exclusive – are loaded with local values and global implications, while they are also imagined as an intimate means to look at ‘home’ – as house, affective community or national identity – from afar, either temporally, spatially or critically. 

Susana Mendes Silva, Symbol, 2008

Artists: Azra Akšamija, Maja Bajević, Alighiero Boetti, Fawzy Emrany, Seulgi Lee, Susana Mendes Silva.  

Artists projects: Azra Akšamija, Maja Bajević, Alighiero Boetti, Fawzy Emrany, Seulgi Lee, Susana Mendes Silva.  
online platform for artistic production and curatorial research
past-forward.net
past forward is a platform for artistic production and curatorial research.  
 
The project starts up from looking at the process of creation of those research-based practices that deal with transmission of memory and fabrication of knowledge, and from considering the Internet as the new “theatre of memory”, a space containing (almost) all the existing knowledge, as well as the tool of a ceaseless (over)production of knowledge.  
 
Within the context of this hyper-production of contents, past forward acts as a “resonance chamber” of our current approach to knowledge – whether this is artistic or societal – and addresses the question of how the Internet may be a space for creation and display of these practices, how it can bring a further reading of their research process and how it can play as a mise en abîme of the overproduction of information.  
 
past forward creates contents – commissioning online site-specific visual art projects (cartes blanches) or publishing critical essays and interviews with artists and curators (blow-up) – while opening windows on external subjects (research), symbolically weaving links between its own constituent elements and those materials that, within the Internet, similarly deal with memory and knowledge.  

Artists projects by: Michelangelo Consani, Jean Philippe Convert, Jacopo Miliani, Joanna Peace, Veit Stratmann. 

Interview with and essays about: Paola Anziché, Jelena Fuzinato, Mnemoscape (Elisa Adami & Alessandra Ferrini), Prajakta Palav, and Anne-Lou Vicente, Raphaël Brunel and Antoine Marchand. 

Artists projects by: Michelangelo Consani, Jean Philippe Convert, Jacopo Miliani, Joanna Peace, Veit Stratmann. 

Interview with and essays about: Paola Anziché, Jelena Fuzinato, Mnemoscape (Elisa Adami & Alessandra Ferrini), Prajakta Palav, and Anne-Lou Vicente, Raphaël Brunel and Antoine Marchand.